PMID: 6619838Aug 1, 1983Paper

Metal ion-tetracycline interactions in biological fluids. 2. Potentiometric study of magnesium complexes with tetracycline, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline, and discussion of their possible influence on the bioavailability of these antibiotics in blood plasma

Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry
G BerthonL Lambs

Abstract

The formation constants of the various complexes formed by magnesium with four tetracycline derivatives, namely, tetracycline itself, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline, were determined by potentiometry over large pH ranges under experimental conditions pertaining to blood plasma (37 degrees C, NaCl 0.15 mol dm-3). The results were used, together with those previously obtained on the complexation of these tetracyclines with proton and calcium, to assess the influence of the two alkali earth metal ions on the bioavailability of these drugs in blood plasma. Accordingly, simulations of the distribution of the four tetracyclines into their different proton and metal complex species were calculated. The distributions confirm that, in combination with the protein-bound fraction of the tetracyclines, the metal-bound fraction represents more than 99% of these drugs in plasma, the extent of their free fraction commonly being less than 1%.

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Citations

Jul 2, 2010·American Journal of Physiology. Cell Physiology·Michael O GriffinFrancisco Villarreal
Nov 1, 1990·Biopharmaceutics & Drug Disposition·H JungR Moreno-Esparza
Oct 1, 2008·Journal of Phycology·Roberta J GarciaRenate Reimschuessel
Oct 19, 2010·Pharmacological Research : the Official Journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society·Michael O GriffinFrancisco J Villarreal
Aug 27, 2003·Medicinal Research Reviews·Li-June Ming
Jun 2, 2016·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·Chinwe U Chukwudi
Jun 13, 2008·Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry : JBIC : a Publication of the Society of Biological Inorganic Chemistry·Gottfried J PalmWinfried Hinrichs
Nov 26, 2009·Macromolecular Bioscience·Ghareb Mohamed SolimanFrançoise M Winnik
Jun 14, 2003·Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology·Markéta SmídkováGustav Entlicher
Jun 9, 2015·Journal of Neural Engineering·Zhiling ZhangYinghui Zhong
Dec 22, 2006·Environmental Science & Technology·Kennedy F Rubert, Joel A Pedersen

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