Jun 15, 2007

Methylation status and protein expression of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in breast cancer

Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
Zhen LiuQiang Zhang

Abstract

Protein expression product of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene is an important component of Wnt signal transduction pathway. APC gene inactivation leads to dysfunction of beta-catenin protein degradation, and then activates Tcf/Lef and causes abnormal transcription of oncogenes, such as c-myc, c-jun and cyclin D1, finally leads to carcinogenesis. This study was to investigate the correlation of methylation status of APC gene promoter 1A to protein expression of APC gene in breast cancer, and analyze the correlation of aberrant methylation of APC gene to clinicopathologic features of breast cancer. Methylation status of APC gene promoter 1A in 76 specimens of breast cancer and corresponding adjacent tissues was detected by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction; the expression of APC protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. The methylation rate of APC gene promoter 1A was significantly higher in breast cancer than in pericancerous normal breast tissue (36.8% vs. 0, P < 0.05). The positive rate of APC protein was significantly lower in breast cancer than in normal breast tissue (52.4% vs. 100%, P < 0.05). The promoter methylation of APC gene was positively correlated to TNM stage (r=0.296, P < 0.05), but negativ...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

JUN gene
Noninfiltrating Intraductal Carcinoma
Protein Degradation, Regulatory
Immunohistochemistry
TNM Staging System
Beta catenin
Protein Methylation
APC gene
APC Gene Inactivation
Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis

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