PMID: 6989293Mar 1, 1980Paper

Minoxidil in the treatment of refractory hypertension

Angiology
T RosenthalH Boichis

Abstract

Minoxidil, a powerful vasodilator, is a very effective antihypertensive drug. Twenty-two patients, who were mostly refractory to conventional anti-hypertensive medication, were treated with this drug. There was a swift and definite drop of blood pressure in all cases. In 7 patients with renal disease, renal function did not deteriorate during the administration of minoxidil, and it improved dramatically in the eighth patient. Side effects of the drug were hirsutism, fluid retention, and in 1 patient a pruritic bullous erruption which disappeared when the drug was discontinued.

References

Feb 1, 1975·The Journal of Clinical Investigation·W A Pettinger, K Keeton
Oct 1, 1976·Annals of Internal Medicine·K ChatterjeeB Zacherle
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Citations

Apr 19, 2003·Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV·R P R Dawber, J Rundegren
Apr 18, 2008·Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases·Harald FjällbrantLars Olof Larsson

Related Concepts

Diastolic Blood Pressure
Hirsutism
Hypertensive Disease
U 10858
Nephrotic Syndrome
Pruritus
Pyrimidines
Vesicular Skin Diseases

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