Oct 30, 2016

Misregulation of the dependence receptor DCC and its upstream lincRNA, LOC100287225, in colorectal cancer

Tumori
Mina KazemzadehBehrooz Shokoohi

Abstract

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a class of regulatory RNAs, play a major role in various cellular processes. Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs), a subclass of lncRNAs, are involved in the trans- and cis-regulation of gene expression. In the case of cis-regulation, by recruiting chromatin-modifying complexes, lincRNAs influence adjacent gene expression. We used quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate the coexpression of LOC100287225, a lincRNA, and DCC, one of its adjacent genes that is often decreased in colorectal cancer, in pairs of tumor and adjacent tumor-free tissues of 30 colorectal cancer patients. The qRT-PCR results revealed the misregulation of these genes during tumorigenesis. Their relative expression levels were significantly lower in tumor tissues than adjacent tumor-free tissues. However, the analysis found no significant correlation between reduced expression of these genes. Our study demonstrated the concurrent misregulation of DCC and LOC100287225 in colorectal cancer.

  • References24
  • Citations7

Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Cellular Process
Genes
RNA, Untranslated
Tumor Tissue Sample
Regulation of Biological Process
Hormone Receptors, Cell Surface
Regulatory Sequences, Ribonucleic Acid
Complex (molecular entity)

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