Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel dopamine receptor (D3) as a target for neuroleptics

Nature
P SokoloffJ C Schwartz

Abstract

A dopamine receptor has been characterized which differs in its pharmacology and signalling system from the D1 or D2 receptor and represents both an autoreceptor and a postsynaptic receptor. The D3 receptor is localized to limbic areas of the brain, which are associated with cognitive, emotional and endocrine functions. It seems to mediate some of the effects of antipsychotic drugs and drugs used against Parkinson's disease, that were previously thought to interact only with D2 receptors.

References

Jun 17, 1998·Developmental Dynamics : an Official Publication of the American Association of Anatomists·A M Faisst, P Gruss
Feb 1, 1996·Synapse·M S Starr
Sep 24, 1999·Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society·P BarbantiG L Lenzi
May 1, 1992·Annals of Neurology·M R LuquinJ A Obeso
Oct 1, 1992·Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society·A Nieoullon, L Kerkerian-Le Goff
Jul 1, 1993·Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society·P G Strange
Oct 2, 1998·Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society·H L RyooJ N Joyce
Jan 1, 1993·Medicinal Research Reviews·Y NomuraY Tokumitsu
Aug 1, 1993·Synapse·P SeemanP S Anderson
Jul 1, 1994·Synapse·J N Nobrega, P Seeman

Citations

Aug 15, 1978·European Journal of Pharmacology·A J PuechJ R Boissier
Jan 11, 1979·Nature·J W Kebabian, D B Calne
Dec 1, 1977·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·F SangerA R Coulson
Jan 1, 1990·Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology·L Birnbaumer
Oct 1, 1989·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·J H Meador-WoodruffO Civelli
Dec 1, 1989·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·D K GrandyA C Server
Aug 1, 1989·American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology·C D StraderR A Dixon
Jul 1, 1989·Physiological Reviews·K StarkeH Kilbinger
Oct 1, 1987·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·L J EmorineA D Strosberg
Nov 1, 1986·Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology·K SvenssonA CARLSSON
Dec 22, 1988·Nature·J R BunzowO Civelli
May 19, 1987·Biochemistry·H G DohlmanR J Lefkowitz
Nov 1, 1988·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·S S KarnikH G Khorana
Nov 15, 1988·Biochemical Pharmacology·M N LeonardP G Strange
Feb 5, 1985·European Journal of Pharmacology·T M DawsonJ K Wamsley
Apr 1, 1974·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·Y C Clement-CormierP Greengard
Jun 1, 1972·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·H Aviv, P Leder
Apr 1, 1973·Virology·F L Graham, A J van der Eb
Jan 1, 1970·European Journal of Pharmacology·N E AndénU Ungerstedt
Sep 1, 1984·Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology·P SokoloffJ C Schwartz
Jan 1, 1980·Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology·P SokoloffJ C Schwartz
Jan 1, 1963·Acta Pharmacologica Et Toxicologica·A CARLSSON, M LINDQVIST

Related Concepts

Antipsychotic Effect
Dopamine D3 receptor
Brain
Drd3 protein, rat
Guanylyl Imidodiphosphate
Dopamine D2 Receptor
Antipsychotic Agents
Brain Chemistry
Homologous Sequences, Nucleic Acid
Dopamine Receptor

Related Feeds

Antipsychotic Drugs

Antipsychotic drugs are a class of medication primarily used to manage psychosis (including delusions, hallucinations, paranoia or disordered thought), principally in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Discover the latest research on antipsychotic drugs here