Aug 6, 2015

Monocytes from HIV-infected individuals show impaired cholesterol efflux and increased foam cell formation after transendothelial migration

AIDS
Anna MaisaAnthony Jaworowski

Abstract

HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals have an increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease which is independent of antiretroviral therapy and traditional risk factors. Monocytes play a central role in the development of atherosclerosis, and HIV-related chronic inflammation and monocyte activation may contribute to increased atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Using an in-vitro model of atherosclerotic plaque formation, we measured the transendothelial migration of purified monocytes from age-matched HIV+ and uninfected donors and examined their differentiation into foam cells. Cholesterol efflux and the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes were also assessed. Monocytes from HIV+ individuals showed increased foam cell formation compared with controls (18.9 vs. 0%, respectively, P = 0.004) and serum from virologically suppressed HIV+ individuals potentiated foam cell formation by monocytes from both uninfected and HIV+ donors. Plasma tumour necrosis factor (TNF) levels were increased in HIV+ vs. control donors (5.9 vs. 3.5 pg/ml, P = 0.02) and foam cell formation was inhibited by blocking antibodies to TNF receptors, suggesting a direct effect on monocyte differentiation to foam cells. Monocytes from ...Continue Reading

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  • Citations15

Mentioned in this Paper

Epicholesterol
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Cholesterol Metabolic Process
Plaque, Atherosclerotic
Genes
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor
Transendothelial Migration
Tumor Lysis Syndrome
Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolic Process
Chronic Inflammation

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