PMID: 108262May 1, 1979

Morphological and physiological study of autolytic-defective Streptococcus faecium strains

Journal of Bacteriology
D L ShunguG D Shockman

Abstract

Three autolytic-defective mutants of Streptococcus faecium (S. faecalis ATCC 9790) were isolated. All three autolytic-defective mutants exhibited the following properties relative to the parental strain: (i) slower growth rates, especially in chemically defined medium; (ii) decreased rates of cellular autolysis and increased survival after exposure to antibiotics which block cell wall biosynthesis; (iii) decreased rates of cellular autolysis when treated with detergents, suspended in autolysis buffers, or grown in medium lacking essential cell wall precursors; (iv) a reduction in the total level of cellular autolytic enzyme (active plus latent forms of the enzyme); (v) an increased ratio of latent to active forms of autolysin; and (vi) increased levels of both cellular lipoteichoic acid and lipids.

Related Concepts

Antibiotics
Bacteriolysis
Cell Wall
Hydrolase
Lipids
Enterococcus faecalis
Tensides
Teichoic Acids

Related Feeds

Antifungals (ASM)

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Antifungals

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.