Dec 8, 2015

Multiscale Modeling of Cancer

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Kerri-Ann NortonAleksander S Popel

Abstract

Breast cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death in women, exceeded only by lung cancer. Specifically, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the worst prognosis, as it is more invasive and lacks estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors that can be targeted with therapies. Due to the need for effective therapies for this type of breast cancer, it is critical to develop methods to (1) understand how TNBC progresses and (2) facilitate development of effective therapies. Here, we describe a multiscale model focusing on tumor formation. Our approach uses multiple scales to investigate the progression and possible treatments of tumors.

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Mentioned in this Paper

ErbB-2 Receptor
Cessation of Life
Neoplasms
Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms
Progesterone
Progesterone [EPC]
Carcinoma of Lung
Progesterone Measurement
ERBB2 gene
ERBB2 wt Allele

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