Jun 1, 1976

Neonatal infection with mouse thymic virus: effects on cells regulating the antibody response to type III pneumococcal polysaccharide

The Journal of Immunology : Official Journal of the American Association of Immunologists
H C MorseP J Baker

Abstract

Mice infected neonatally with mouse thymic virus (TA) were evaluated at different ages with respect to their ability to give a plaque-forming cell (PFC) response to type III pneumococcal polysaccharide (SSS-III), as well as the degree of amplifier and suppressor thymus-derived (T) cell activity present. B cell activity matured rapidly from 2 to 4 weeks of age and was not affected by TA infection. Amplifier T cell activity matured progressively over the first 8 weeks of life and was transiently suppressed in TA-infected mice at 4 weeks of age. Suppressor T cell activity measured at 2,4, and 6 weeks of age was unaffected by TA. The findings suggest that TA is highly tropic for T cells and has selective effects on subpopulations of T cells.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Thymic Group Viruses
T-Lymphocyte
CD4+ CD25+ Regulatory T Cells
Antibodies, Viral
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Neoplasm of Uncertain or Unknown Behavior of Thymus
Disease of Thymus Gland
Senility
Dental Plaque
Herpesviridae Infections

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