Feb 9, 2008

Neuroanatomy of autism

Trends in Neurosciences
David G AmaralChristine Wu Nordahl

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder is a heterogeneous, behaviorally defined, neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs in 1 in 150 children. Individuals with autism have deficits in social interaction and verbal and nonverbal communication and have restricted or stereotyped patterns of behavior. They might also have co-morbid disorders including intellectual impairment, seizures and anxiety. Postmortem and structural magnetic resonance imaging studies have highlighted the frontal lobes, amygdala and cerebellum as pathological in autism. However, there is no clear and consistent pathology that has emerged for autism. Moreover, recent studies emphasize that the time course of brain development rather than the final product is most disturbed in autism. We suggest that the heterogeneity of both the core and co-morbid features predicts a heterogeneous pattern of neuropathology in autism. Defined phenotypes in larger samples of children and well-characterized brain tissue will be necessary for clarification of the neuroanatomy of autism.

  • References62
  • Citations531

References

  • References62
  • Citations531

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Imaging Studies
Adrenal Cortex Diseases
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Autopsy
Epilepsy
Neurons
Brain
Purkinje Cells
Neuroanatomy
Gray Matter

Related Feeds

Amygdala and Midbrain Dopamine

The midbrain dopamine system is widely studied for its involvement in emotional and motivational behavior. Some of these neurons receive information from the amygdala and project throughout the cortex. When the circuit and transmission of dopamine is disrupted symptoms may present. Here is the latest research on the amygdala and midbrain dopamine.

Astrocytes

Astrocytes are glial cells that support the blood-brain barrier, facilitate neurotransmission, provide nutrients to neurons, and help repair damaged nervous tissues. Here is the latest research.

Autism

Autism spectrum disorder is associated with challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, and often accompanied by sensory sensitivities and medical issues. Here is the latest research.

Basal Ganglia

Basal Ganglia are a group of subcortical nuclei in the brain associated with control of voluntary motor movements, procedural and habit learning, emotion, and cognition. Here is the latest research.

Amygdala: Sensory Processes

Amygdalae, nuclei clusters located in the temporal lobe of the brain, play a role in memory, emotional responses, and decision-making. Here is the latest research on sensory processes in the amygdala.

Related Papers

Current Opinion in Neurobiology
Daniel H Geschwind, Pat Levitt
The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Cynthia M SchumannDavid G Amaral
International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the International Society for Developmental Neuroscience
Margaret L Bauman, Thomas L Kemper
© 2020 Meta ULC. All rights reserved