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Neuropathologic Associations of Learning and Memory in Primary Progressive Aphasia

JAMA Neurology

May 18, 2016

Stephanie KielbSandra Weintraub

Abstract

The dementia syndrome of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) can be caused by 1 of several neuropathologic entities, including forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) or Alzheimer disease (AD). Although episodic memory is initially spared in this syndrome, the subtle learning an...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Familial Alzheimer Disease (FAD)
Memory Loss
Research
Abnormal Degeneration
Primary Progressive Aphasia (Disorder)
TDP-43 protein, human
Autopsy
Memory for Designs Test
Severity of Illness Index
4
4
1
40
Paper Details
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Neuropathologic Associations of Learning and Memory in Primary Progressive Aphasia

JAMA Neurology

May 18, 2016

Stephanie KielbSandra Weintraub

PMID: 27183206

DOI: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2016.0880

Abstract

The dementia syndrome of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) can be caused by 1 of several neuropathologic entities, including forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) or Alzheimer disease (AD). Although episodic memory is initially spared in this syndrome, the subtle learning an...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Familial Alzheimer Disease (FAD)
Memory Loss
Research
Abnormal Degeneration
Primary Progressive Aphasia (Disorder)
TDP-43 protein, human
Autopsy
Memory for Designs Test
Severity of Illness Index
4
4
1
40

Similar Papers Found In These Feeds

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Paper Details
References
  • References
  • Citations1
  • finger pointing at paper

    References currently unavailable

    We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
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