Oct 16, 2019

New and enlarging white matter lesions adjacent to the ventricle system and thalamic atrophy are independently associated with lateral ventricular enlargement in multiple sclerosis

Journal of Neurology
Tim SinneckerÖzgür Yaldizli

Abstract

To investigate the association between new or enlarging T2-weighted (w) white matter (WM) lesions adjacent to the ventricle wall, deep grey matter (DGM) atrophy and lateral ventricular enlargement in multiple sclerosis (MS). Patients derived from the Genetic Multiple Sclerosis Associations study. Lateral ventricles and DGM were segmented fully automated at baseline and 5 years follow-up using Automatic Lateral Ventricle delineation (ALVIN) and Multiple Automatically Generated Templates brain segmentation algorithm (MAgeT), respectively. T2w and T1w lesions were manually segmented. To investigate the association between lesion distance to the ventricle wall and the lateral ventricle volume, we parcellated the WM into concentric periventricular bands using FMRIB Software Library. Associations between clinical and MRI parameters were assessed in generalized linear models using generalized estimating equations for repeated measures. We studied 127 MS patients. Lateral ventricles enlarged on average by 2.4%/year. Patients with new/enlarging T2w WM lesions between baseline and follow-up at 5 years had accelerated lateral ventricular enlargement compared with patients without (p = 0.004). This was true in a multivariable analysis adju...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Cerebral Atrophy
Follow-up
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Gray Matter
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Lateral
SET protein, human
Analysis

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