Mar 19, 2009

New perspectives on folate transport in relation to alcoholism-induced folate malabsorption--association with epigenome stability and cancer development

The FEBS Journal
Abid HamidJyotdeep Kaur

Abstract

Folates are members of the B-class of vitamins, which are required for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines, and for the methylation of essential biological substances, including phospholipids, DNA, and neurotransmitters. Folates cannot be synthesized de novo by mammals; hence, an efficient intestinal absorption process is required. Intestinal folate transport is carrier-mediated, pH-dependent and electroneutral, with similar affinity for oxidized and reduced folic acid derivatives. The various transporters, i.e. reduced folate carrier, proton-coupled folate transporter, folate-binding protein, and organic anion transporters, are involved in the folate transport process in various tissues. Any impairment in uptake of folate can lead to a state of folate deficiency, the most prevalent vitamin deficiency in world, affecting 10% of the population in the USA. Such impairments in folate transport occur in a variety of conditions, including chronic use of ethanol, some inborn hereditary disorders, and certain diseases. Among these, ethanol ingestion has been the major contributor to folate deficiency. Ethanol-associated folate deficiency can develop because of dietary inadequacy, intestinal malabsorption, altered hepatobiliary me...Continue Reading

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References

Mentioned in this Paper

Metabolic Process, Cellular
Pathogenic Aspects
Ethanol
DNA Methylation [PE]
Exertion
Pathogenesis
Derivatives
Organic Anion Transporters
Ethanol Measurement
Protein Methylation

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