Newly diagnosed and previously known diabetes mellitus and short-term outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction

Coronary Artery Disease
Li TianYanmin Yang

Abstract

The prognostic value of diabetes mellitus (DM) on the long-term outcomes of patients after myocardial infarction has been well established. The correlation between DM, including newly diagnosed DM, and short-term outcomes needs to be validated. A total of 5410 ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients with typical chest pain onset in the past 12 h were enrolled. Follow-ups were carried out on days 7 and 30 after hospital admission. According to 2013 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, the study population was stratified into the following three groups: no diabetes, newly diagnosed diabetes, and previously known diabetes. The primary outcomes of our study were mortality from all causes and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at days 7 and 30. Patients with previously known diabetes were older and had a higher incidence of previous history of cardiovascular disease compared with the other groups. The 7-day and 30-day mortality was similar between patients without DM and patients with newly diagnosed DM. For both groups, this was significantly lower than that in patients with DM. Similar results were observed for 7-day and 30-day MACE. Multivariable Cox regression analysis indicated that newly diagnosed diabet...Continue Reading

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