PMID: 15659949Jan 22, 2005Paper

Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure

Current Opinion in Critical Care
Adnan Majid, Nicholas S Hill

Abstract

This review critically examines recent literature related to applications of noninvasive ventilation in the acute setting. Recent articles have strengthened the evidence supporting the use of noninvasive ventilation for patients with cardiogenic pulmonary edema and exacerbation of severe chronic pulmonary obstructive disease. In the former, however, it remains unclear whether noninvasive ventilation offers any significant advantages over continuous positive airway pressure. The rate of myocardial infarction seems to be no higher when patients with cardiogenic pulmonary edema are treated with noninvasive ventilation rather than continuous positive airway pressure, although caution is still advised in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Noninvasive ventilation also does not seem to increase the risk of dissemination of severe acute respiratory syndrome to health care workers as long as strict isolation procedures are used. Noninvasive ventilation facilitates weaning in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but should not be used routinely to treat extubation failure, and necessary intubation should not be delayed. Guidelines for the use of noninvasive ventilation can alter caregivers' behavior but have not been ...Continue Reading

References

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Citations

Nov 23, 2012·Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine·Ozkan DevranAdnan Yılmaz

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