Jul 24, 2013

Novel γ-secretase modulators for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: a review focusing on patents from 2010 to 2012

Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Patents
Martin PetterssonDouglas S Johnson

Abstract

γ-Secretase is the enzyme responsible for the final step of amyloid precursor protein proteolysis to generate Aβ peptides including Aβ42 which is believed to be a toxic species involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression. γ-Secretase modulators (GSMs) have been shown to selectively lower Aβ42 production without affecting total Aβ levels or the formation of γ-secretase substrate intracellular domains such as APP intracellular domain and Notch intracellular domain. Therefore, GSMs have emerged as an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. The literature covering novel GSMs will be reviewed focusing on patents from 2010 to 2012. During the last review period (2008 - 2010) considerable progress was made developing GSMs with improved potency for lowering Aβ42 levels, but most of the compounds resided in unfavorable central nervous system (CNS) drug space. In this review period (2010 - 2012), there is a higher percentage of potent GSM chemical matter that resides in favorable CNS drug space. It is anticipated that clinical candidates will emerge out of this cohort that will be able to test the GSM mechanism of action in the clinic.

  • References53
  • Citations21

References

  • References53
  • Citations21

Mentioned in this Paper

Familial Alzheimer Disease (FAD)
Notch
Heterocyclic Compounds
Analgesics, Anti-Inflammatory
Protoplasm
Amyloid Beta Precursor Protein Measurement
Alzheimer's Disease
O-(glucuronic acid 2-sulfate)-(1--4)-O-(2,5)-anhydromannitol 6-sulfate
Proteolysis
Enzyme Inhibitors

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