PMID: 11131740Dec 29, 2000Paper

Nutritional factors and vertical transmission of HIV-1. Epidemiology and potential mechanisms

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
W W Fawzi

Abstract

Transmission of HIV from mothers to children may occur through the transplacental, intrapartum, or breastfeeding routes. Adequate nutritional status may reduce vertical transmission by affecting several maternal or fetal and child risk factors for transmission including enhancing systemic immune function in the mother or fetus/child; reducing the rate of clinical, immunological, or virological progression in the mother; reducing viral load or the risk of viral shedding in lower genital secretions or breast milk; reducing the risks of low birth weight or prematurity; or by maintaining the integrity of the fetus/child gastrointestinal integrity. In prospective observational studies, low plasma vitamin A levels were associated with higher risks of vertical transmission. However, findings from randomized, controlled trials suggest that supplements of vitamin A or other vitamins are unlikely to have an effect on vertical transmission during pregnancy or the intrapartum period. The effect of other nutrient supplements, such as zinc and selenium, is unknown. Similarly, whether nutrition supplements of mothers during the breastfeeding period has an effect on transmission is unknown. The potential benefits of direct supplementation of c...Continue Reading

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Citations

Mar 7, 2002·Current Opinion in Pediatrics·Warren A Andiman
Nov 20, 2002·Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes : JAIDS·Wafaie FawziDavid Hunter
Jul 20, 2002·Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes : JAIDS·Saidi H KapigaWafaie W Fawzi
Aug 21, 2004·Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes : JAIDS·Sukhum JiamtoShabbar Jaffar
Jan 1, 2002·African Journal of AIDS Research : AJAR·Alison Katz
May 31, 2002·The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition·Michele L Dreyfuss, Wafaie W Fawzi
Oct 6, 2004·Food and Nutrition Bulletin·Suneetha Kadiyala, Stuart Gillespie
Sep 8, 2017·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Charles S WiysongeMuki S Shey

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