Occupational asthma in antibiotic manufacturing workers: case reports and systematic review

Journal of Allergy
Sara Díaz AnguloP Cullinan

Abstract

Background. The risks of occupational asthma (OA) from antibiotics are uncertain. We report 4 new cases and a systematic review of the literature. Methods. Cases were identified through a specialist clinic, each underwent specific provocation testing (SPT). We subsequently reviewed the published literature. Results. The patients were employed in the manufacture of antibiotics; penicillins were implicated in three cases, in the fourth erythromycin, not previously reported to cause OA. In two, there was evidence of specific IgE sensitisation. At SPT each developed a late asthmatic reaction and increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness. 36 case reports have been previously published, 26 (citing penicillins or cephalosporins). Seven cross-sectional workplace-based surveys found prevalences of 5-8%. Conclusions. OA in antibiotic manufacturers may be more common than is generally recognised. Its pathogenesis remains unclear; immunological tests are of uncertain value and potential cases require confirmation with SPT. Further study of its frequency, mechanisms, and diagnosis is required.

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Citations

Jan 12, 2016·International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health·Thao Thi Thu NguyenHiroyuki Nakamura
Aug 30, 2012·Clinics in Chest Medicine·Catherine LemiereJacques-André Pralong
Jul 9, 2016·International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health·Ali Asghar FarshadRoksana Mirkazemi
Apr 19, 2018·Journal of Tropical Medicine·Sahle AsfawMessay Woldemariam
Jul 1, 2020·International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health·Angelica I TiotiuDenislava Nedeva

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Methods Mentioned

BETA
ELISA

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