Jan 10, 2014

Opposing Microtubule Motors Control Motility, Morphology, and Cargo Segregation During ER-to-Golgi Transport

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Anna K BrownDavid J Stephens

Abstract

We recently demonstrated that dynein and kinesin motors drive multiple aspects of endosomal function in mammalian cells. These functions include driving motility, maintaining morphology (notably through providing longitudinal tension to support vesicle fission), and driving cargo sorting. Microtubule motors drive bidirectional motility during traffic between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Here, we have examined the role of microtubule motors in transport carrier motility, morphology, and domain organization during ER-to-Golgi transport. We show that consistent with our findings for endosomal dynamics, microtubule motor function during ER-to-Golgi transport of secretory is required for motility, morphology of, and cargo sorting within vesicular tubular carriers en route to the Golgi. Our data are consistent with previous findings that defined roles for dynein-1 and kinesin-1 (KIF5B) and kinesin-2 in this trafficking step. Our high resolution tracking data identify some intriguing aspects. Depletion of kinesin-1 reduces the number of motile structures seen which is in line with other findings relating to the role of kinesin-1 in ER export. However, those transport carriers that were produced had a much greater run leng...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

KIF2B
Cavity of Golgi Vesicle
Dynein Activity
Golgi Apparatus
Coating Excipient
Cell Motility
SNX1
Science of Morphology
Kinesin Activity
KIF5B gene

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