PMID: 849665May 1, 1977Paper

Orbital involvement in acute sinusitis. Lessons from 24 childhood patients

Clinical Pediatrics
D B Hawkins, R W Clark

Abstract

The possibility of acute bacterial sinusitis should be considered in any child with sudden swelling about the orbit. Management is determined by the stage of the disease as well as by the sinus predominantly involved. Extraocular movements and proptosis are the best guidelines for therapy. When there is no proptosis and extraocular mobility is normal, conservative therapy with intravenous antibiotics and nasal decongestants is usually effective. When ocular mobility is impaired or proptosis develops, intranasal or external surgical drainage are usually required. Of 24 patients summarized in this paper, the ethmoid was the predominantly involved sinus in 12, the frontal in 7, the maxillary in 5. Only 4 of the 12 with predominant ethmoiditis required surgery. All 7 were predominant frontal involvement needed surgical drainage.

References

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Citations

Apr 15, 2004·International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology·Brian W Herrmann, James W Forsen
Jan 3, 1997·International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology·K D PereiraR H Lazar
Mar 4, 2000·International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology·A MurrayM S Morrissey
Dec 1, 1987·The Journal of Laryngology and Otology·R P Mills
Dec 1, 1980·Ophthalmology·J I MacyD S Minckler
Apr 1, 1980·Computerized Tomography·J S LeoJ P Sackler
Apr 26, 2003·Pediatric Clinics of North America·M F MafeeJill Pierce
Jan 1, 1990·Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases·J Suonpää, J Antila
Aug 1, 1985·Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences·R P Mills, J M Kartush
Sep 1, 1982·Head & Neck Surgery·J B Rubinstein, S D Handler
Mar 1, 1980·Head & Neck Surgery·L T Bilaniuk, R A Zimmerman
Nov 22, 2019·Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery : Official Publication of the Association of Otolaryngologists of India·Semridhi Gupta, Shivam Sharma
Mar 1, 1987·Head & Neck Surgery·K Jackson, S R Baker

Related Concepts

Abscess
Acute Disease
Blepharitis
Conjunctivitis
Ethmoid Sinus Structure
Frontal Sinus
Maxillary Sinus
Pachymeningitis
Ocular Orbit
Osteitis

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