Jan 1, 1975

Origination and importance of glycolysis for malignomas and utilization of this property in the chemotherapy of cancer (author's transl)

Archiv für Geschwulstforschung
G Sydow

Abstract

Glycolysis is not of importance for the process of carcinogenesis. It is very likely, however, that certain molecular-biological and genetic changes are produced which enable the malignant cell to develop an intensive glycolysis, for instance, to form specialized glycolytic isoenzymes already during oncogenesis, and may possible become effective in the primary tumour. As soon as the capacity of the cancer cell to intensive aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis has become manifest, this process is an irreversible one. The extent of glycolysis of a malignoma is greatly dependent on the degree of its dedifferentiation and vascularization (glucose supply), although a direct correlation between growth and the amount of lactic acid formed does not seem to exist. However, a certain utilization of glucose is essential for cell proliferation (supply of basic substances). In many cases there is a correlation between the extent of glycolysis measurable under optimal conditions in vitro (glycolytic power) in a malignant tumour and its growth rate recognizable in vivo. The formation of a strong capacity for glucose degradation via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway that cannot be fully utilized by the whole tumour in vivo is first of all designed to en...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Normal Cell
Enzymes, antithrombotic
Tumor Tissue Sample
Accessory Atrioventricular Bundle
Dedifferentiation
Neoplasms
Tumor Lysis Syndrome
Glucose, (beta-D)-Isomer
Lactic Acid Measurement
Cell Proliferation

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