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Palatal fusion - where do the midline cells go? A review on cleft palate, a major human birth defect

Acta histochemica

Sep 12, 2006

Marek DudasVesa Kaartinen

Abstract

Formation of the palate, the organ that separates the oral cavity from the nasal cavity, is a developmental process characteristic to embryos of higher vertebrates. Failure in this process results in palatal cleft. During the final steps of palatogenesis, two palatal shelves outgrowing ...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Vertebrates
Embryo
Entire Oral Cavity
Cell Fate
Nasal Cavity
Transdifferentiation
Structure of Papilla Incisiva of Mouth
Apoptosis, Intrinsic Pathway
Cleft Palate, Isolated
Body Cavities
58
1
Paper Details
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  • Citations33
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  • References67
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Palatal fusion - where do the midline cells go? A review on cleft palate, a major human birth defect

Acta histochemica

Sep 12, 2006

Marek DudasVesa Kaartinen

PMID: 16962647

DOI: 10.1016/j.acthis.2006.05.009

Abstract

Formation of the palate, the organ that separates the oral cavity from the nasal cavity, is a developmental process characteristic to embryos of higher vertebrates. Failure in this process results in palatal cleft. During the final steps of palatogenesis, two palatal shelves outgrowing ...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Vertebrates
Embryo
Entire Oral Cavity
Cell Fate
Nasal Cavity
Transdifferentiation
Structure of Papilla Incisiva of Mouth
Apoptosis, Intrinsic Pathway
Cleft Palate, Isolated
Body Cavities
58
1

Similar Papers Found In These Feeds

Apoptosis

Apoptosis is a specific process that leads to programmed cell death through the activation of an evolutionary conserved intracellular pathway leading to pathognomic cellular changes distinct from cellular necrosis

Cell Migration

Cell migration is involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes such as embryonic development, cancer metastasis, blood vessel formation and remoulding, tissue regeneration, immune surveillance and inflammation. Here is the latest research.

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Paper Details
References
  • References67
  • Citations33
12345...
  • References67
  • Citations33
1234
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