Nov 5, 2018

Pan-cancer analysis on microRNA-mediated gene activation

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Hua TanXiaobo Zhou

Abstract

While microRNAs (miRNAs) were widely considered to repress target genes at mRNA and/or protein levels, emerging evidence from in vitro experiments has shown that miRNAs can also activate gene expression in particular contexts. However, this counterintuitive observation has rarely been reported or interpreted in in vivo conditions. We systematically explored the positive correlation between miRNA and gene expressions and its potential implications in tumorigenesis, based on 8375 patient samples across 31 major human cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Results indicated that positive miRNA-gene correlations are surprisingly prevalent and consistent across cancer types, and show distinct patterns than negative correlations. The top-ranked positive correlations are significantly involved in the immune cell differentiation and cell membrane signaling related processes, and display strong power in stratifying patients in terms of survival rate, demonstrating their promising clinical relevance. Although intragenic miRNAs generally tend to co-express with their host genes, a substantial portion of miRNAs shows no obvious correlation with their host gene due to non-conservation. A miRNA can upregulate a gene by inhibiting its u...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Study
In Vivo
Patterns
MicroRNA Gene
Genome
Genes
Regulation of Biological Process
Transcription, Genetic
Gene Expression
Study of Epigenetics

About this Paper

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