Parainfluenza 3 infection blocks the ability of a beta adrenergic receptor agonist to inhibit antigen-induced contraction of guinea pig isolated airway smooth muscle

The Journal of Clinical Investigation
C K BucknerP Shult

Abstract

Guinea pigs, actively sensitized to ovalbumin, were inoculated by nasal insufflation with parainfluenza 3 or virus growth medium 4 d before performing in vitro pharmacological studies on tracheal and bronchial smooth muscle. In each airway segment, cumulative dose-response effects of ovalbumin were obtained in the absence and presence of a maximally effective concentration of a beta adrenergic receptor agonist, sulfonterol. Sulfonterol shifted the dose-response curve to the right and reduced the maximum smooth muscle contractile response to ovalbumin. Virus infection did not alter the dose-response effects of ovalbumin. However, the magnitude of the inhibitory effects of sulfonterol was smaller in segments taken from animals inoculated with virus. Blockade by virus infection of the inhibitory effect of sulfonterol was reversed when the concentrations of beta agonist were increased. Sulfonterol did not alter the dose-response effects of histamine at any of the concentrations that markedly antagonized the effects of ovalbumin. Virus infection did not alter the sensitivities to sulfonterol or papaverine in producing relaxation in either airway segment. The magnitude of relaxation produced by papaverine was significantly larger in ...Continue Reading

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