Oct 21, 2015

Parainfluenza Virus Types 1, 2, and 3 in Pediatric Patients with Acute Respiratory Infections in Beijing During 2004 to 2012

Chinese Medical Journal
Fang WangYuan Qian

Abstract

Although human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) has been determined as an important viral cause of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in infants and young children, data on long-term investigation are still lacking to disclose the infection pattern of HPIV in China. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 25,773 hospitalized pediatric patients with ARIs from January 2004 through December 2012 for respiratory virus screen by direct immuno-fluorescence assay. Out of these specimens, 1675 (6.50%, 1675/25,773) showed HPIV positive, including 261 (1.01%, 261/25,773) for HPIV1, 28 (0.11%, 28/25,773) for HPIV2, and 1388 (5.39%, 1388/25,773) for HPIV3, 2 of the samples were positive for both HPIV1 and HPIV3, and 36 were co-detected with other viruses. The positive rates of HPIVs were higher in those younger than 3 years old. HPIV3 was detected from all age groups, predominantly from patients under 3 years of age, and the highest frequency was found in those 6 months to 1-year old (352/4077, 8.63%). HPIV3 was the dominant type in each of the years detected between May and July. HPIV1 showed a peak in every odd year, mainly in August or September. HPIV was detected most frequently from patients with upper respiratory infection (12.49%, 1...Continue Reading

Mentioned in this Paper

Patterns
Ari-2 protein, Drosophila
Virus
Virus Diseases
Nasopharynx
Bronchiolitis
P protein, Human parainfluenza virus 3
Acute Respiratory Infections
Paramyxoviridae Infections
Aspirate Substance

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