PMID: 7993283Jun 1, 1994Paper

Patient satisfaction with a mood disorders unit: elements and components

The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
K EyersP Mitchell

Abstract

Patient satisfaction is an indicator of effective service provision and may influence compliance with treatment. Of 265 patients attending a specialised mood disorders unit and surveyed at least two years after their initial contact, 221 (83%) replied. Characteristics of responders and non-responders were compared on demographic and clinical information from index assessment and follow-up. Sixty-four percent of responders were very satisfied and 21% partly satisfied with their management. Components of satisfaction included perceived competence of clinical management; the unit's administrative and after-treatment accessibility; and the support of staff and other patients. Those with a more adequate personality and melancholic depression at baseline assessment were more satisfied. A low current mood state at time of survey was associated with lower satisfaction in non-melancholics only. There were interactions between improvement in condition, diagnosis, personality and satisfaction. The survey provided a framework for formulating treatment programmes and was a useful quality assurance tool.

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Citations

Mar 27, 1998·The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research·L BakerM J Gross
Jul 3, 2010·International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health·Michael F Hilton, Harvey A Whiteford
Jul 27, 2010·BMC Public Health·Michael F Hilton, Harvey A Whiteford
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May 2, 2000·The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry·G ParkerK Eyers

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