DOI: 10.1101/490771Dec 9, 2018Paper

Peer pressure from a Proteus mirabilis self-recognition system controls participation in cooperative swarm motility

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Murray J Tipping, Karine A Gibbs

Abstract

Colonies of the opportunistic pathogen Proteus mirabilis can distinguish self from non-self: in swarming colonies of two different strains, one strain excludes the other from the expanding colony edge. Predominant models characterize bacterial kin discrimination as immediate antagonism towards non-kin cells, typically through delivery of toxin effector molecules from one cell into its neighbor. Upon effector delivery, receiving cells must either neutralize it by presenting a cognate anti-toxin, as would a clonal sibling, or suffer cell death or irreversible growth inhibition, as would a non-kin cell. Here we expand this paradigm to explain the non-lethal Ids self-recognition system, which stops access to a cooperative social behavior in P. mirabilis through a distinct mechanism: selectively and transiently inducing non-self cells into a lifestyle incompatible with cooperative swarming. This state is characterized by reduced expression of genes associated with protein synthesis, virulence, and motility, and also causes non-self cells to tolerate previously lethal concentrations of antibiotics. We found that entry into this state requires a temporary activation of the stringent response in non-self cells and results in the iterat...Continue Reading

Related Concepts

Antibiotics
Cell Death
Cell Motility
Genes
Proteus mirabilis
Virulence
Proximal
Mirabilis
Recognition (Psychology)
Protein Biosynthesis

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