Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in children: Is early feeding safe?

Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Ali IslekReha Artan

Abstract

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred method to provide nutritional support for patients with normal gastrointestinal function but cannot be fed orally for a variety of reasons. Owing to safety concerns, the first feeding after PEG tube placement is generally delayed. Early feeding may be an option; however, childhood studies regarding early feeding after the PEG procedure are highly insufficient. A prospective randomized controlled study was conducted to compare early (4th hour) and late (12th hour) feeding after the PEG procedure. The PEG process was performed with the standard pull technique. Prophylactic antimicrobial drugs were not used. Complications such as gastric residue after feeding, vomiting, fever, systemic signs of infection, and duration of hospital stay were recorded. Tube feeding training was given to parents during their stay in the hospital in both groups. In the first and third days following PEG, the patients were visited by an experienced nurse in their homes and evaluated in terms of potential complications. The study was completed with a total of 69 patients: 35 in the early feeding group and 34 in the late feeding group. The demographic characteristics of the groups were similar. Vo...Continue Reading

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Nov 7, 2016·JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition·Joseph I BoullataUNKNOWN ASPEN Safe Practices for Enteral Nutrition Therapy Task Force, American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Feb 6, 2018·Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition·Kelly DriverMichael Wilsey
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Jun 23, 2021·Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition·Matjaž HomanJorge Amil-Dias

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