Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in small medically complex infants

Endoscopy
L Wilson, M Oliva-Hemker

Abstract

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is an established procedure for pediatric patients; however, there is still relatively little information on its feasibility and safety in very small infants. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in infants weighing less than 3.5 kg. The charts of 26 infants weighing less than 3.5 kg who received PEGs were retrospectively reviewed. At the time of gastrostomy insertion the mean weight was 3 kg and the mean age was 2.3 months. This population of infants carried multiple diagnoses including lung disease of prematurity, swallowing dysfunction, chromosomal abnormality, structural facial anomaly, neurological deficit and congenital heart disease. Infants received either a 14- or 15-Fr percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube under general anesthesia. All 26 procedures were successfully completed. Two infants (7.6%) developed a pneumoperitoneum during the procedure which required intervention. Two infants (7.6%) were conservatively treated with oral antibiotics for mild skin erythema and one infant (3.8%) required intravenous antibiotics for cellulitis of the stoma site. There were no other complications. To date, 16 of the gastrostomy tube...Continue Reading

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