pH dependency in uptake of sulfonamides by bacteria

Chemotherapy
D Büttner, H Büttner

Abstract

Sulfonamide-sensitive cells of Escherichia coli were incubated under standarized conditions with various sulfonamides and the quantity of sulfonamide uptake into the bacteria measured. The test substances reached a higher concentration inside the bacteria than in the incubation medium, the degree of accumulation varying for the individual substances despite uniformly applied incubation conditions. In all cases a pH dependency was detected which varied with the pKa values of the substances tested. On the basis of the pKa dependency of the pH effect, the sulfonamide uptake can be interpreted as being a passive diffusion process. Knowing the intracellular pH value, which was determined by the DMO method, it was then possible to calculate the theoretically expected value for the accumulation as a concentration coefficient. Since the calculated and experimentally determined values differ approximately by a factor of 2, an intracellular binding of the sulfonamides is assumed. The same results were obtained in cells of sulfonamide-resistant E. coli strains.

Citations

Sep 4, 2007·Chemosphere·Christiane ZarflJörg Klasmeier

Related Concepts

Antibiotic Resistance, Microbial
Alkalescens-Dispar Group
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Sulfonamides

Related Feeds

Antimicrobial Resistance (ASM)

Antimicrobial resistance poses a significant threat to the continued successful use of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of bacterial infections.

Antimicrobial Resistance

Antimicrobial resistance poses a significant threat to the continued successful use of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of bacterial infections.

Allergy & Infectious Diseases (ASM)

Allergies result from the hyperreactivity of the immune system to some environmental substance and can be life-threatening. Infectious diseases are caused by organisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. They can be transmitted different ways, such as person-to-person. Here is the latest research on allergy and infectious diseases.

Allergy & Infectious Diseases

Allergies result from the hyperreactivity of the immune system to some environmental substance and can be life-threatening. Infectious diseases are caused by organisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. They can be transmitted different ways, such as person-to-person. Here is the latest research on allergy and infectious diseases.