PMID: 8345562Jun 1, 1993Paper

Pharmacokinetics of single intravenous and single and multiple dose oral administration of rifampin in mares

Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
C W KohnS Wallace

Abstract

The disposition of rifampin in six healthy mares after single intravenous (i.v.) and oral (p.o.) doses and after seven oral doses of 10 mg/kg administered twice a day was investigated using a high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method. Pharmacokinetic variables for rifampin determined using the HPLC method were comparable to variables reported from earlier studies utilizing a microbiological assay. Desascetylrifampin, a major metabolite of the parent compound, could not be detected in the serum but was detected at low concentrations in urine. Mean trough concentrations of rifampin increased from the first to the second dose of the multiple dose oral study and then remained unchanged through 72 h. At 84 h after the first dose (i.e. 12 h after the final dose) the rifampin concentration was significantly decreased (P = 0.001). The harmonic mean of the half-life of rifampin decreased significantly from 13.3 h after a single oral dose of 7.99 h after the seventh oral dose. The mean serum protein binding of rifampin over the concentration range of 2-20 micrograms/ml was 78%. Mean trough serum concentrations of unbound rifampin after multiple oral doses ranged from 0.67 micrograms/ml at 24 h to 0.40 micrograms/ml at 72 h. T...Continue Reading

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Citations

Apr 1, 1995·Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics·R SamsS M Ashcraft
Jun 1, 2017·International Journal of Mycobacteriology·Poopak FarniaJalaledin Ghanavi
Oct 1, 2005·The Journal of Comparative Neurology·Paul L A GabbottSarah J Busby

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