Plasma catecholamines and cardiovascular responses during converting enzyme inhibition in normotensive and hypertensive man

Clinical and Experimental Hypertension. Part A, Theory and Practice
A P NiarchosJ H Laragh

Abstract

The hemodynamic and plasma catecholamine responses to isometric exercise and head up tilt were investigated in normotensive and hypertensive subjects during normal and low sodium intake and before and during the administration of the converting enzyme inhibitors teprotide or captopril. Although teprotide and captopril decreased significantly the mean arterial pressure during both sodium intakes the normal pattern of hemodynamic response to hand grip and head up tilt was preserved. Moreover changes of plasma catecholamines during hand grip and head up tilt were not affected either by teprotide or captopril. When following the administration of teprotide or captopril fainting occurred either in the seated position or during head up tilt it was associated not only with a decrease in arterial pressure but also with a concurrent reduction in cardiac output and/or hypovolemia. It is concluded that converting enzyme inhibition does not impair significantly the cardiovascular responses which are mediated via the sympathetic nervous system either in normotensive or in hypertensive subjects.

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Jan 1, 1986·European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology·A A AjayiJ L Reid
May 14, 2009·Vascular Health and Risk Management·Bernard Waeber, Luis M Ruilope
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Nov 22, 2007·Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology·Sara Del ColleFranco Veglio

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