PMID: 39481Sep 1, 1979

Pneumonia and pneumococcal infections, with special reference to pneumococcal pneumonia. The 1979 J. Burns Amberson lecture

The American Review of Respiratory Disease
M Finland

Abstract

An etiologic classification of acute pneumonia was presented and the relative importance of some of the causative agents was briefly reviewed. The early developments of the therapy of pneumococcal pneumonia with type-specific antisera, sulfonamide drugs, and antimicrobial drugs were reviewed, mostly from the experiences of the author at Boston City Hospital. Changes in the occurrence and relative importance of the pneumococcus as a cause of infections associated with bacteremia, empyema, and meningitis were demonstrated, based on cases observed at Boston City Hospital during 12 selected years between 1935 and 1972. These findings, among others, indicate that the pneumococcus is still one of the most important causes of serious bacterial infections and of mortality from such infections, particularly in the elderly. Some possible indications for polyvalent pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine were discussed, and the need for further extensive clinical and field trials to demonstrate its range of effectiveness was stressed.

Related Concepts

Empyema
Ilotycin
Fetal Mummification
Immune Sera
Normal Serum Globulin Therapy
Penicillin Resistance
Penicillin
Pneumococcal Infections
Experimental Lung Inflammation
Streptococcal Pneumonia

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