Jan 28, 2015

Population diversification in a yeast metabolic program promotes anticipation of environmental shifts

PLoS Biology
Ophelia S VenturelliHana El-Samad

Abstract

Delineating the strategies by which cells contend with combinatorial changing environments is crucial for understanding cellular regulatory organization. When presented with two carbon sources, microorganisms first consume the carbon substrate that supports the highest growth rate (e.g., glucose) and then switch to the secondary carbon source (e.g., galactose), a paradigm known as the Monod model. Sequential sugar utilization has been attributed to transcriptional repression of the secondary metabolic pathway, followed by activation of this pathway upon depletion of the preferred carbon source. In this work, we demonstrate that although Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells consume glucose before galactose, the galactose regulatory pathway is activated in a fraction of the cell population hours before glucose is fully consumed. This early activation reduces the time required for the population to transition between the two metabolic programs and provides a fitness advantage that might be crucial in competitive environments.

Mentioned in this Paper

Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Microorganism
Metabolic Process, Cellular
In Silico
LGALS7 wt Allele
Flow Cytometry
Biochemical Pathway
Galactokinase
Ethanol
HIRA gene

Related Feeds

BioHub - Researcher Network

The Chan-Zuckerberg Biohub aims to support the fundamental research and develop the technologies that will enable physicians to cure, prevent, or manage all diseases in our childrens' lifetimes. The CZ Biohub brings together researchers from UC Berkeley, Stanford, and UCSF. Find the latest research from the CZ Biohub researcher network here.

Advanced Imaging of Cellular Signaling

Cell signaling is a vital mechanism for communication within cells and outside with the environment. Several different signaling pathways have been found and advanced imaging techniques are being developed to visualize the molecules involved in these signaling pathways. Find the latest research in advanced imaging of cellular signaling here.