PMID: 3768365Nov 6, 1986

Possible basis for membrane changes in nonparasitized erythrocytes of malaria-infected animals

Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta
P JoshiC M Gupta

Abstract

Previous studies (Gupta et al. (1982) Nature 299, 259-261) have shown that nonparasitized erythrocytes of Plasmodium knowlesi-infected monkeys contain the procoagulant phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) in the outer-half of their membrane bilayer. A reinvestigation of this problem has now revealed that in acute P. knowlesi infection, at least 30% of the infected animals do not have this abnormality. However, PS externalization was a consistent feature in the uninfected red cells of chronically infected animals. Also, a similar membrane change was observed in the red cells of uninfected splenectomized monkeys. These results strongly suggest that spleen plays an important role in maintaining the exclusive inner distribution of PS in the normal erythrocyte membrane, and that partial migration of this lipid to the outer monolayer in nonparasitized erythrocytes could be attributed to an abnormal physiology of this organ in malarial infection.

Citations

Mar 22, 2003·Blood·Fausta Omodeo-SalèDonatella Taramelli
Oct 21, 2018·Malaria Journal·N J White

Related Concepts

Red Cell Ghost
Macaca mulatta
Malaria
Phosphatidylserines
Phospholipids
Spleen

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