Post-extubation prophylactic nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants: Systematic review and meta-analysis

Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Peter G Davis, D J Henderson-Smart

Abstract

To determine whether management with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) in preterm infants having their endotracheal tube removed following a period of intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV), leads to an increased proportion remaining free of additional ventilatory support, compared to extubation directly to headbox oxygen. Search Strategy- Searches were made of the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Medline, abstracts of conferences and symposia proceedings, expert informants, journal hand searching mainly in the English language and expert informant searches in the Japanese language. Selection criteria- All trials utilising random or quasi-random patient allocation, in which NCPAP (delivered by any method) was compared with headbox oxygen for postextubation care were included. Methodological quality was assessed independently by the two authors. Data collection and analysis- Data were extracted independently by the two authors. Meta-analysis using event rate ratios (ERRs) and event rate differences (ERDs) was performed using Revman 3.0 statistical software. Prespecified subgroup analysis to determine the impact of different levels of NCPAP and use of aminophylline were also performed using the same...Continue Reading

References

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Citations

May 12, 2006·Journal of Perinatology : Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association·J G SaslowK H Pyon
Mar 21, 2000·Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health·P G DavisC Callanan
May 1, 2001·Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health·A M De Klerk, R K De Klerk
Dec 6, 2008·Pediatric Critical Care Medicine : a Journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies·Alice van VelzenAnton van Kaam
Apr 29, 2005·Journal of Perinatology : Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association·Ellina LiptsenSherry E Courtney
Oct 11, 2013·The New England Journal of Medicine·Brett J ManleyPeter G Davis
Aug 30, 2019·BMC Pediatrics·Byoung Kook LeeHan-Suk Kim
May 30, 2003·Intensive Care Medicine·Thomas HückstädtGerd Schmalisch
Jan 31, 2007·Journal of Perinatology : Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association·M T ShoemakerR J DiGeronimo
Mar 20, 2004·Pediatric Pulmonology. Supplement·Aviv D Goldbart, David Gozal
Jun 5, 2003·Pediatric Critical Care Medicine : a Journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies·Maria A. C. Rego, Francisco E. Martinez
Sep 26, 2002·ASAIO Journal : a Peer-reviewed Journal of the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs·Imad R MakhoulPolo Sujov
Jan 26, 2002·Intensive Care Medicine·J Hammer
Apr 21, 2006·Journal of Perinatology : Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association·E Bancalari, T del Moral
Apr 25, 2018·Pediatric Pulmonology·Emanuela ZanninMaria L Ventura

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