Postdictive modulation of visual orientation

PloS One
Takahiro Kawabe

Abstract

The present study investigated how visual orientation is modulated by subsequent orientation inputs. Observers were presented a near-vertical Gabor patch as a target, followed by a left- or right-tilted second Gabor patch as a distracter in the spatial vicinity of the target. The task of the observers was to judge whether the target was right- or left-tilted (Experiment 1) or whether the target was vertical or not (Supplementary experiment). The judgment was biased toward the orientation of the distracter (the postdictive modulation of visual orientation). The judgment bias peaked when the target and distracter were temporally separated by 100 ms, indicating a specific temporal mechanism for this phenomenon. However, when the visibility of the distracter was reduced via backward masking, the judgment bias disappeared. On the other hand, the low-visibility distracter could still cause a simultaneous orientation contrast, indicating that the distracter orientation is still processed in the visual system (Experiment 2). Our results suggest that the postdictive modulation of visual orientation stems from spatiotemporal integration of visual orientation on the basis of a slow feature matching process.

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Citations

Dec 5, 2015·Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience·Takahiro Kawabe
Mar 27, 2015·Proceedings. Biological Sciences·Kyoshiro SasakiKayo Miura

Related Concepts

Mental Concentration
Motion Perception
Psychological Orientation
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Space Perception
Vision
Visual Fields
Psychological Orientation
Spatial Distribution
Research Study

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