PMID: 107725Feb 1, 1979

Precipitation of streptococcal peptidoglycan by human sera: influence of anti-immunoglobulins

Acta Pathologica Et Microbiologica Scandinavica. Section C, Immunology
C Schalén, P Christensen

Abstract

Antibodies to streptococcal peptidoglycan (PG) were detected by gel-precipitation in 38% of sera from blood donors and in 71% of sera with a Waaler-Rose test titre of greater than or equal to 1:64. Twenty-six rheumatoid arthritis sera revealed patterns of interference with complete or partial fusion between PG and aggregated human IgG while none of the sera precipitating both these preparations showed non-interference. The reactions were interpreted as denoting interference between the PG-antibody complexes and aggregated IgG. Conversion of some non-precipitating blood donor sera to PG precipitation was obtained by addition of isolated rheumatoid factor, in itself not precipitating PG, to the sera. Thus, the high frequency of PG precipitation among rheumatoid arthritis sera could--at least in part--be attributed to the participation of anti-IgG in the reaction.

Related Concepts

Anti-Antibodies
Antibodies, Bacterial
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Molecular Sieve Chromatography
Immunodiffusion Measurement
Polyglobin
Pseudomurein
Chemical Precipitation
Streptococcus

Related Feeds

Bacterial Cell Wall Structure

Bacterial cell walls are made of peptidoglycan (also called murein), which is made from polysaccharide chains cross-linked by unusual peptides containing D-amino acids. Here is the latest research on bacterial cell wall structures.

Bacterial Cell Wall Structure (ASM)

Bacterial cell walls are made of peptidoglycan (also called murein), which is made from polysaccharide chains cross-linked by unusual peptides containing D-amino acids. Here is the latest research on bacterial cell wall structures.

© 2021 Meta ULC. All rights reserved