Predicting landscape-genetic consequences of habitat loss, fragmentation and mobility for multiple species of woodland birds

PloS One
J Nevil AmosPaul Sunnucks

Abstract

Inference concerning the impact of habitat fragmentation on dispersal and gene flow is a key theme in landscape genetics. Recently, the ability of established approaches to identify reliably the differential effects of landscape structure (e.g. land-cover composition, remnant vegetation configuration and extent) on the mobility of organisms has been questioned. More explicit methods of predicting and testing for such effects must move beyond post hoc explanations for single landscapes and species. Here, we document a process for making a priori predictions, using existing spatial and ecological data and expert opinion, of the effects of landscape structure on genetic structure of multiple species across replicated landscape blocks. We compare the results of two common methods for estimating the influence of landscape structure on effective distance: least-cost path analysis and isolation-by-resistance. We present a series of alternative models of genetic connectivity in the study area, represented by different landscape resistance surfaces for calculating effective distance, and identify appropriate null models. The process is applied to ten species of sympatric woodland-dependant birds. For each species, we rank a priori the e...Continue Reading

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Citations

Jan 13, 2016·Molecular Ecology·Jonathan L RichardsonStephen F Spear
Aug 27, 2014·Ecological Applications : a Publication of the Ecological Society of America·Samuel A CushmanGerard J Allan
Feb 20, 2013·Molecular Ecology·Anna M SchmidtJudith Korb
Oct 30, 2013·The Journal of Animal Ecology·Katherine A HarrissonPaul Sunnucks
May 3, 2013·PloS One·Kristan A Schneider, Yuseob Kim
May 1, 2019·Anais Da Academia Brasileira De Ciências·Rosana T BragaThiago F Rangel
Jun 18, 2016·Molecular Ecology·Aurélie KhimounStéphane Garnier
Dec 5, 2019·Scientific Reports·H Beáta NagyBéla Tóthmérész

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Software Mentioned

R package lmer4
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