Prenatal diagnosis of congenital cardiac anomalies: a practical approach using two basic views

Radiographics : a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
Jodi M BarbozaTeresita L Angtuaco

Abstract

Structural cardiac anomalies are estimated to occur in 8 of every 1,000 live births. Cardiovascular anomalies are frequently associated with other congenital anomalies because the heart is among the last organs to develop completely in the embryo. The guidelines for routine prenatal evaluation of both the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine require evaluation of the fetal heart. The ultrasonographic (US) view that is most commonly used is the four-chamber view, which allows assessment of abnormalities involving the atria and the ventricles. However, this view is not adequate for demonstrating the outflow tracts of the aorta and pulmonary artery. A base view that demonstrates the crossing of the great vessels can be obtained just superior to the four-chamber view. Addition of the base view to routine US evaluation with the four-chamber view increases not only the sensitivity for detection of cardiac anomalies but also the accuracy of diagnosis.

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Citations

Sep 24, 2011·AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology·Prabhakar RajiahManjiri Dighe
Jan 9, 2014·Physiological Reports·Katrien VandoorneMichal Neeman
Aug 28, 2014·Cardiology in the Young·Sally-Ann B Clur, Caterina M Bilardo
Dec 10, 2009·Radiologic Clinics of North America·José A MaldonadoFernando R Gutiérrez
Dec 17, 2014·Journal of Perinatal Medicine·Rafal Zielinski, Maria Respondek-Liberska
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Jan 29, 2011·The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research·Clarissa VelayoYoshitaka Kimura
Mar 6, 2013·Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology : the Official Journal of the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology· International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and GynecologyS Yagel
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