Primary orbital mycosis in immunocompetent infants

Journal of AAPOS : the Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
Bhavna ChawlaMandeep S Bajaj

Abstract

Fungal orbital infections are rare among children, especially in immunocompetent infants. Two infants presented to us with unilateral proptosis and swelling of the eyelids and periorbital area. Imaging showed an intraorbital mass causing proptosis and bony orbital expansion. There was no sinus, nasal, or intracranial involvement. Systemic evaluation did not reveal any evidence of a compromised immune system. A biopsy from the mass showed the presence of fungal infection. Both infants responded well to medical therapy with intravenous amphotericin B.

References

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May 21, 2011·Journal of AAPOS : the Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus·Bhavna ChawlaMandeep S Bajaj

Citations

Jun 12, 2012·Current Infectious Disease Reports·Maria N GamaletsouThomas J Walsh
May 21, 2011·Journal of AAPOS : the Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus·Bhavna ChawlaMandeep S Bajaj
Jul 2, 2019·Current Opinion in Ophthalmology·Katherine J Williams, Richard C Allen

Related Concepts

Amphotericin B Colloidal Dispersion
Antibiotics, Antifungal
Aspergillosis
Anasarca
Exophthalmos
Eyelid Diseases
Immunocompetence
Intravenous Infusion Procedures
Magnetization Transfer Contrast Imaging
Mucormycosis

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