Feb 14, 2014

Production of systemically circulating Hedgehog by the intestine couples nutrition to growth and development

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Jonathan RodenfelsSuzanne Eaton

Abstract

In Drosophila larvae, growth and developmental timing are regulated by nutrition in a tightly coordinated fashion. The networks that couple these processes are far from understood. Here, we show that the intestine responds to nutrient availability by regulating production of a circulating lipoprotein-associated form of the signaling protein Hedgehog (Hh). Levels of circulating Hh tune the rates of growth and developmental timing in a coordinated fashion. Circulating Hh signals to the fat body to control larval growth. It regulates developmental timing by controlling ecdysteroid production in the prothoracic gland. Circulating Hh is especially important during starvation, when it is also required for mobilization of fat body triacylglycerol (TAG) stores. Thus, we demonstrate that Hh, previously known only for its local morphogenetic functions, also acts as a lipoprotein-associated endocrine hormone, coordinating the response of multiple tissues to nutrient availability.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Hh-1 Antigen
Fat Pad
BMP Binding
Drosophila
Larva
Hedgehog Signaling Pathway
Cell Growth
Intestinal Wall Tissue
Endocrine System
Erinaceidae

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