PMID: 4111814Apr 1, 1972Paper

Production of types A and B spores of Clostridium botulinum by the biphasic method: effect on spore population, radiation resistance, and toxigenicity

Applied Microbiology
A AnellisD B Rowley

Abstract

Spores of three strains each of type A and type B Clostridium botulinum were produced both by a biphasic (solid medium overlaid with an aqueous phase) and by a "conventional" (deep broth culture) procedure. Sporogenesis by the biphasic system was more rapid, convenient, and economical, and yielded as many or more heat-resistant (80 C, 10 min) spores per milliliter as by the conventional technique. Of several aqueous phases [thiamine-hydrochloride, yeast extract, (NH(4))(2)SO(4)] tested with strain 62A, the highest spore colony counts were obtained with 2.0% (NH(4))(2)SO(4). The six strains formed maximum spore numbers in 5 to 6 days of incubation. Spores produced by the two methods had essentially equal radiation resistances (D and lag values), and their subcultures gave similar toxin titers (LD(50) values).

Related Concepts

Ammonium Sulfate
Metazoa
Bacteriological Techniques
Clostridium botulinum
Cobalt Isotopes
Use-Effectiveness
Hot Temperature
Lethal Dose 50
Microscopy, Phase-Contrast
Plant Extracts

Related Feeds

Botulism (ASM)

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum. Discover the latest research on botulism here.

Botulism

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum. Discover the latest research on botulism here.