Profiling the cellular immune response to multiple Brugia pahangi infections in a susceptible host

The Journal of Parasitology
Sharon R ChirgwinT R Klei

Abstract

Human lymphatic filariasis is caused primarily by Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancroffi. Unraveling this disease is complex, as people living in endemic areas exhibit a vast array of clinical states and immune responses. The Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus)-B. pahangi model of human lymphatic filariasis has provided much information on immune parameters associated with filarial infection. Prior investigations in our laboratory have shown that gerbils closely mimic a subset of patients classified as microfilaremic but asymptomatic, a group that comprises the majority of people living in endemic areas. Worm recovery data suggest that gerbils carrying current B. pahangi infections do not show any resistance to subsequent subcutaneous B. pahangi infections. The aim of the present studies was to investigate the T cell cytokine response in gerbils receiving multiple infections of B. pahangi as a means of mimicking the conditions experienced by people in endemic areas. The T cell cytokine profile generated by multiply infected gerbils was not different from that previously generated by gerbils infected only once with B. pahangi. Gerbils infected multiple times with B. pahangi showed a transient increase in IL-5, which corresp...Continue Reading

References

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Datasets Mentioned

BETA
L37779
L37780
L37781
AF518409
L37782
L37778

Methods Mentioned

BETA
PCR

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