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Prominent hypometabolism of the right temporoparietal and frontal cortex in two left-handed patients with primary progressive aphasia

Journal of Neurology

Sep 21, 2002

Alexander DrzezgaAlexander Kurz

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Abstract

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by progressive deterioration of language function with relative preservation of other cognitive functions. Previous studies based on neuroimaging and histology point to predominantly left temporal pathology in PPA patients. Here we repo...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Cortex Bone Disorders
Adrenal Cortex Diseases
Histology Procedure
Primary Progressive Aphasia (Disorder)
Tomography, Emission-Computed
Wernicke Area
Histology
Ambidexterity
Neuroimaging
Glucose Metabolism
Paper Details
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Prominent hypometabolism of the right temporoparietal and frontal cortex in two left-handed patients with primary progressive aphasia

Journal of Neurology

Sep 21, 2002

Alexander DrzezgaAlexander Kurz

PMID: 12242551

DOI: 10.1007/s00415-002-0832-z

Abstract

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by progressive deterioration of language function with relative preservation of other cognitive functions. Previous studies based on neuroimaging and histology point to predominantly left temporal pathology in PPA patients. Here we repo...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Cortex Bone Disorders
Adrenal Cortex Diseases
Histology Procedure
Primary Progressive Aphasia (Disorder)
Tomography, Emission-Computed
Wernicke Area
Histology
Ambidexterity
Neuroimaging
Glucose Metabolism

Feeds With Similar Papers

Aphasia

Aphasia affects the ability to process language, including formulation and comprehension of language and speech, as well as the ability to read or write. Here is the latest research on aphasia.

Neuroimaging

Neuroimaging is a useful tool for studying brain function as well as for diagnosis of diseases and injuries to the brain. Follow this feed to stay up to date.

Related Papers

Behavioural Neurology

Right hemisphere involvement in non-fluent primary progressive aphasia

Behavioural NeurologyApril 24, 2008
Claudia RepettoCarlo Miniussi
Annals of Neurology

Clinical, neuroimaging, and pathologic features of progressive nonfluent aphasia

Annals of NeurologyFebruary 1, 1996
R S TurnerM Grossman
Paper Details
References
  • References
  • Citations9
  • finger pointing at paper

    References currently unavailable

    We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations9
1

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