PMID: 782624Jul 1, 1976Paper

Prophylaxis against anaerobic sepsis in bowel surgery

The British Journal of Surgery
M R KeighleyJ Alexander-Williams

Abstract

Sixty-two patients were admitted to a prospective randomized controlled trial to investigate the influence of a prophylactic antibiotic, lincomycin, on anaerobic sepsis following bowel surgery. The incidence of postoperative sepsis was reduced from 45 to 18 per cent (P less than 0-025). Wound infections were reduced from 38 to 12 percent (P less than 0-05). Intra-abdominal or pelvic abscess occurred in 1 of the treated group compared with 3 controls. Septicaemia occurred after operation in 1 patient receiving lincomycin and in 3 of the controls; in 2 of the latter, pure growths of bacteroides were isolated from the blood cultures and 1 of these patients died. Although lincomycin had no influence on the number of patients who developed aerobic postoperative infections, there was a significant reduction in the incidence of sepsis due to bacteroides, which occurred in 10 of the control group compared with 1 in the lincomycin group (P less than 0-005). No patients developed complications attributable to lincomycin, such as pseudomembranous colitis. These data indicate that the genus Bacteroides are important pathogenic organisms and are responsible for postoperative morbidity. Furthermore, anaerobic sepsis can be reduced by appropr...Continue Reading

References

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Citations

May 1, 1982·World Journal of Surgery·M R Keighley
Jul 1, 1991·Diseases of the Colon and Rectum·L S JørgensenP Søgaard
Jan 1, 1980·Diseases of the Colon and Rectum·G B Thow
Mar 1, 1980·Diseases of the Colon and Rectum·K C HanelE Reiss-Levy
Mar 1, 1980·Diseases of the Colon and Rectum·C HiggensJ Alexander-Williams
May 4, 2005·Surgical Infections·Donald E Fry, Surgical Infection Society--Europe
Apr 1, 1980·Annals of Surgery·E P DellingerM Steer
Mar 29, 1980·British Medical Journal
Nov 29, 1985·The American Journal of Medicine·S Levin, L J Goodman
Feb 1, 1986·American Journal of Surgery·M D SarapC W Jones
May 13, 2014·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Richard L NelsonMarija Barbateskovic
May 1, 1977·The British Journal of Surgery·M R Keighley
Aug 1, 1978·The British Journal of Surgery·Y ArabiM R Keighley
Jan 1, 1981·Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology·D Raahave

Related Concepts

Bacteroides
Bacteroides Infections
Clinical Trials
Colectomy
Large Intestine
Lincomycin Monohydrochloride, (L-threo)-Isomer
Rectum
Surgical Wound Infection
Pyemia

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