Mar 24, 2020

Protein transmission in neurodegenerative disease

Nature Reviews. Neurology
Chao PengVirginia M Y Lee

Abstract

Most neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the intracellular or extracellular aggregation of misfolded proteins such as amyloid-β and tau in Alzheimer disease, α-synuclein in Parkinson disease, and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Accumulating evidence from both human studies and disease models indicates that intercellular transmission and the subsequent templated amplification of these misfolded proteins are involved in the onset and progression of various neurodegenerative diseases. The misfolded proteins that are transferred between cells are referred to as 'pathological seeds'. Recent studies have made exciting progress in identifying the characteristics of different pathological seeds, particularly those isolated from diseased brains. Advances have also been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the transmission process, and the influence of the host cell on the conformation and properties of pathological seeds. The aim of this Review is to summarize our current knowledge of the cell-to-cell transmission of pathological proteins and to identify key questions for future investigation.

  • References243
  • Citations

References

  • References243
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Evaluation
Host Cell
Protein Conformation
Neurodegenerative Disorders
DNA Amplification
Disease Progression
Extracellular
Protein Aggregation, Pathological
Human Study
Intracellular

Related Feeds

Alzheimer's Disease: Tau & TDP-43

Alzheimer's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disease. This feed focuses on the underlying role of Tau proteins and TAR DNA-binding protein 43, as well as other genetic factors, in Alzheimer's.

Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation (MDS)

Alpha-synucleins are small proteins that are believed to restrict the mobility of synpatic vesicles and inhibit neurotransmitter release. Aggregation of these proteins have been linked to several types of neurodegenerative diseases including dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease. Here is the latest research on α-synuclein aggregation.

ALS: Therapies

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease, is associated with the death of neurons that control voluntary muscles. Discover the latest research on ALS therapies here.

Alzheimer's Disease: Abeta

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease associated with accumulation of amyloid plaques, which are comprised of amyloid beta. Here is the latest research in this field.

ALS

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease, is associated with the death of neurons that control voluntary muscles. Discover the latest research on ALS here.

ALS & FTD: TDP-43

ALS shares with a considerable proportion of FTD cases the same neuropathological substrate, namely, inclusions of abnormally phosphorylated protein tdp-43 (ptdp-43). Here are the latest discoveries pertaining to ptdp-43 and these diseases.

ALS - Pathogenic Mechanisms

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by muscle weakness. Here is the latest research investigating pathogenic mechanisms that underlie this genetically heterogeneous disorder.

Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation

Alpha-synucleins are small proteins that are believed to restrict the mobility of synpatic vesicles and inhibit neurotransmitter release. Aggregation of these proteins have been linked to several types of neurodegenerative diseases including dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease. Here is the latest research on α-synuclein aggregation.