PMID: 6085091Dec 1, 1984Paper

Pseudomonas aeruginosa cross-infection following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

The Journal of Hospital Infection
E M CryanP W Keeling

Abstract

In a 6 week period, three of 50 patients developed Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicaemia following Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype 10 was isolated from each of the patients and from the endoscope. The outbreak was related to inadequate disinfection of the air and water channel of the endoscope. Following the introduction of a modified decontamination technique, which involved rinsing the air and water channel with glutaraldehyde, no further cases of pseudomonas infection occurred, and the organism could not be isolated from the instrument. Obstruction of the biliary tract was a predisposing factor in the development of infection; and administration of antibiotics immediately following the procedure failed to prevent it. This may have been due to inadequate dosage. We suggest that patients presenting for ERCP, in whom obstruction of the biliary tract is suspected, should come prepared for immediate drainage of the obstructed system at the time of the procedure.

References

Dec 1, 1981·The Journal of Hospital Infection·J R BabbV Melikian
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Citations

Jul 1, 1988·Gastrointestinal Endoscopy·M B AlbertS K Irani
Apr 2, 1999·Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics·J M SubhaniJ S Dooley
May 2, 2002·Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology·Balakrishnan S Ramakrishna
Oct 28, 2015·Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology : the Official Journal of the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America·Susan E BeekmannJohn E Bennett
Mar 22, 2008·Gastrointestinal Endoscopy·Subhas BanerjeeLeslie E Stewart
Mar 21, 1998·American Journal of Infection Control·M R RohrA P Ferrari Júnior
Feb 1, 1994·American Journal of Infection Control·S A NakaharaM J Hardy
Mar 1, 1988·The American Journal of Medicine·D C ClassenR S Evans
Mar 31, 2015·Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology : the Official Journal of the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America·Kristen A WendorfJeffrey Duchin
Feb 26, 2008·The Journal of Infection·Robert J CarpenterAnuradha Ganesan
Apr 5, 2013·Clinical Microbiology Reviews·Julia KovalevaJohn E Degener
Jan 1, 1987·Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases·Y Siegman-IgraJ Cahaner
Jun 27, 2019·Digestive Endoscopy : Official Journal of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society·Ryuichi IwakiriHisao Tajiri
Jul 1, 2006·World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG·Douglas B Nelson, Lawrence F Muscarella

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