Pyoderma caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in dogs: 20 cases

Veterinary Dermatology
Andrew HillierJoseph J Kowalski

Abstract

In this report we describe the historical, clinical, histopathological and microbiological features, as well as treatments and clinical outcome, of pyoderma where Pseudomonas aeruginosa alone was isolated on bacterial culture from lesional skin. Twenty dogs were included in this retrospective study. Seven dogs without prior history of systemic or skin disease presented with acute deep pseudomonal pyoderma characterized by a sudden onset of dorsal truncal pain. Skin lesions in these dogs consisted of erythematous papules, haemorrhagic bullae, ulcers and haemorrhagic crusts confined to the dorsum. An excellent clinical response was achieved with 3-4 weeks of treatment with oral fluoroquinolones. Thirteen dogs with a more gradual onset of skin lesions associated with pseudomonal pyoderma had a history of prior skin, ear or systemic disease and had previously been treated with antibiotics and/or immunomodulatory drugs. Skin lesions in these dogs were variable and similar to those described for superficial and deep staphylococcal pyoderma. In this group, one dog was euthanized prior to commencement of treatment, two dogs were lost to follow up, and 9 had resolution of lesions following treatment with topical silver sulfadiazine (one...Continue Reading

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Citations

Nov 28, 2012·The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice·Kinga Gortel
Sep 1, 2009·Research in Veterinary Science·Monika Pogány SimonováMichaela Haviarová
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