PMID: 7083123Jul 1, 1982Paper

Rates of hospital-acquired bloodstream infections in patients with specific malignancy

Cancer
J W Mayo, R P Wenzel

Abstract

Prospective surveillance of hospitalized patients with leukemia or solid tumors was performed in order to define the rate of nosocomial bloodstream infection according to specific diagnosis. During the 38-month study, there were 842 nosocomial blood stream infections in 704 patients, 22% of whom had leukemia or solid tumors. In the patients with malignancy, the diagnoses associated with the highest rate of bloodstream infections were chronic myeloid leukemia (18.4/100 patients), acute lymphocyte leukemia (17.7/100), promyelocytic and undifferentiated leukemia (16.1/100) and acute monocytic/myelomonocyte (13.8/100). In 76% of patients with chronic lymphocytic, chronic myeloid, or undifferentiated leukemia, the peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte count at the time of bacteremia was less than 100 cells/mm-3. In contrast to patients with leukemia, those with solid tumors, as a group, were at no greater risk of bloodstream infection than those without malignancy. In preparation for prophylactic trials of antibiotics or immunotherapy this study has more clearly defined the risk of bloodstream infection in cancer patients.

References

Nov 1, 1979·The Journal of Infectious Diseases·J FreemanJ E McGowan
Jul 1, 1981·Reviews of Infectious Diseases·R P WenzelG B Miller
Mar 1, 1980·The American Journal of Medicine·B E KregerW R McCabe

Citations

Apr 1, 1997·Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research : the Official Journal of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research·J LuhmL Rink
Oct 21, 2000·Mayo Clinic Proceedings·S TsiodrasD P Kontoyiannis
Mar 1, 1991·Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology : the Official Journal of the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America·A TrillaJ Garcia San Miguel
Jan 1, 1988·Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology : the Official Journal of the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America·C RotsteinJ Fitzpatrick
Nov 25, 2003·Hematology·Susan N O'BrienElias J Anaissie
Jun 28, 2003·British Journal of Nursing : BJN·Eleni ApostolopolouTheophanis Katostaras

Related Concepts

Infections, Hospital
Hospital Stay
Leukemia
Lymphoma
Malignant Neoplasms
Pyemia

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